September 1, 2014   391,378 notes

mylifeaskriz:

ruineshumaines:

Liz Climo on Tumblr.

this really cheered me up

(via minimoonstar)

September 1, 2014   161,875 notes

hot-potato-cold-bazooka:

hot-potato-cold-bazooka:

So I’m moving into a new apartment, and I was told that the room had been damaged, but nothing could have prepared me for the fact that someone had carved Li Shang’s head out of the bathroom door and written “We must defeat the Huns!” on it.

image

(via minimoonstar)

September 1, 2014   272 notes
finalfantasyseries:

FF14 by  5啦啦

finalfantasyseries:

FF14 by 5啦啦

(via aldenard)

September 1, 2014   756,150 notes

queenfreija:

runewynd:

carnivaloftherandom:

surdoues:

briannathestrange:

rufflesnotdiets:

how to walk like a queen [x]

This is the best acting lesson I have every seen in my life

image

Auto-reblog.

ALWAYS relevant.

Important Life Lesson.

(Source: graybles, via korrigan)

September 1, 2014   874 notes

there, together again. sort of.

(Source: narvaezray, via idrilka)

September 1, 2014   130,755 notes
barlightsprettygirls:

This is such a cute idea!

barlightsprettygirls:

This is such a cute idea!

(Source: princesscharmont, via rageprufrock)

September 1, 2014   585,999 notes

(Source: mulders, via coupleofbananas)

September 1, 2014   10,156 notes
melodiebenford:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

Our unsung heros that contribute just as much to science as the PI. The lab assistant, the cataloguer, the person who takes data. Many times they contribute to the IP, help work through troubleshooting and maintaining lab equipment. It takes a village to make significant breakthroughs in science.

melodiebenford:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

Our unsung heros that contribute just as much to science as the PI. The lab assistant, the cataloguer, the person who takes data. Many times they contribute to the IP, help work through troubleshooting and maintaining lab equipment. It takes a village to make significant breakthroughs in science.

(via howstuffworks)

September 1, 2014   188,579 notes

colonelcheru:

lunulata:

No really. Watch this.

Ancient Chinese instrument, the sheng, which originated back in 1,100 BC, and it can perfectly replicate the music in Mario.

omg she’s doing the coin noises too

(via stockinettestitch)

September 1, 2014   6,709 notes

(Source: shoraii, via asplund)